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New Scientist International Edition

May 14 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

A dangerous beginning • Ending abortion protections in the US will drive inequality and threaten public health

New Scientist International Edition

Amazon deforestation • Lax law enforcement has allowed huge numbers of trees to be cut down in the Brazilian rainforest, reports Adam Vaughan

We could exceed 1.5°C by 2026

Life during India’s heatwave • Extreme spring temperatures show the need for long-term heat action plans as India’s climate warms, reports Payal Dhar

How quickly can you catch covid-19 again? • A prior infection appears to offer some protection, but it is unclear for how long, or whether reinfections are guaranteed to be mild, finds Clare Wilson

Virus found in pig heart recipient • The first person to receive a pig’s heart has died after a porcine-specific viral infection was discovered within the organ, but the cause of death is unclear, reports Michael Le Page

Will the Central African Republic’s bitcoin experiment flop? • The second country to make the cryptocurrency legal tender may end up benefiting criminals and warlords most, reports Luke Taylor

Liquid crystals shape laser beam into a photorealistic cat

Discrimination and harassment • The workplace can be a hostile environment for minority groups in STEM. Gege Li reports

What is at risk if Roe v Wade falls? • State laws could restrict abortion in large parts of the US, and other reproductive healthcare offerings may be at stake, reports Dana G. Smith

I’m in a virtual world – leave me a message

Jackals seen stealing prey killed by lynx

Hungry worms will risk hurt if it helps them reach a meal

Privileged people misjudge pro-equality policies

Toxic foam clouds hit Colombia • Polluted rivers near Bogotá are creating dangerous froth that is making people sick

Brain cells linked to Parkinson’s disease finally identified

Vaquitas could breed their way back from brink of extinction

Webcam test could show whether you lack a mind’s eye

Five recent mega heatwaves that slipped under the radar

Jab for glandular fever virus tested

Eat microbial protein to spare the forests

Really brief

Vast water store under Antarctic ice

Gene change after split from chimps linked to cancer risk

Turning moon dust into oxygen and fuel

Not alien, just Australian • Writing off the amazing adaptations of Australian mammals as “weird” and “primitive” hurts conservation efforts, says Jack Ashby

Field notes from space-time • Science: a team sport Far from the stereotype of a lone genius, research is very collaborative. We must get better at showing others what it is really like, says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Vital connection

Your letters

Codes, cyphers and a cuppa • A moving exhibition at Bletchley Park shows women’s crucial contribution to the success of the UK’s wartime intelligence centre, finds Nicholas Wroe

The cycle of life • A fundamental process in our cells may explain the origin of life and the cause of cancer, finds Michael Marshall

Don’t miss

The film column • Law versus science A low-income Chilean community faces down the Swedish company whose toxic sludge was dumped near its homes. Arica tells the gut-wrenching story of their fight for justice, finds Simon...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: May 14 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: May 12, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

A dangerous beginning • Ending abortion protections in the US will drive inequality and threaten public health

New Scientist International Edition

Amazon deforestation • Lax law enforcement has allowed huge numbers of trees to be cut down in the Brazilian rainforest, reports Adam Vaughan

We could exceed 1.5°C by 2026

Life during India’s heatwave • Extreme spring temperatures show the need for long-term heat action plans as India’s climate warms, reports Payal Dhar

How quickly can you catch covid-19 again? • A prior infection appears to offer some protection, but it is unclear for how long, or whether reinfections are guaranteed to be mild, finds Clare Wilson

Virus found in pig heart recipient • The first person to receive a pig’s heart has died after a porcine-specific viral infection was discovered within the organ, but the cause of death is unclear, reports Michael Le Page

Will the Central African Republic’s bitcoin experiment flop? • The second country to make the cryptocurrency legal tender may end up benefiting criminals and warlords most, reports Luke Taylor

Liquid crystals shape laser beam into a photorealistic cat

Discrimination and harassment • The workplace can be a hostile environment for minority groups in STEM. Gege Li reports

What is at risk if Roe v Wade falls? • State laws could restrict abortion in large parts of the US, and other reproductive healthcare offerings may be at stake, reports Dana G. Smith

I’m in a virtual world – leave me a message

Jackals seen stealing prey killed by lynx

Hungry worms will risk hurt if it helps them reach a meal

Privileged people misjudge pro-equality policies

Toxic foam clouds hit Colombia • Polluted rivers near Bogotá are creating dangerous froth that is making people sick

Brain cells linked to Parkinson’s disease finally identified

Vaquitas could breed their way back from brink of extinction

Webcam test could show whether you lack a mind’s eye

Five recent mega heatwaves that slipped under the radar

Jab for glandular fever virus tested

Eat microbial protein to spare the forests

Really brief

Vast water store under Antarctic ice

Gene change after split from chimps linked to cancer risk

Turning moon dust into oxygen and fuel

Not alien, just Australian • Writing off the amazing adaptations of Australian mammals as “weird” and “primitive” hurts conservation efforts, says Jack Ashby

Field notes from space-time • Science: a team sport Far from the stereotype of a lone genius, research is very collaborative. We must get better at showing others what it is really like, says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Vital connection

Your letters

Codes, cyphers and a cuppa • A moving exhibition at Bletchley Park shows women’s crucial contribution to the success of the UK’s wartime intelligence centre, finds Nicholas Wroe

The cycle of life • A fundamental process in our cells may explain the origin of life and the cause of cancer, finds Michael Marshall

Don’t miss

The film column • Law versus science A low-income Chilean community faces down the Swedish company whose toxic sludge was dumped near its homes. Arica tells the gut-wrenching story of their fight for justice, finds Simon...


Expand title description text