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New Scientist International Edition

May 21 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

The climate imperative • We can’t let crucial action on emissions be derailed by today’s short-term crises

New Scientist International Edition

Bitcoin powers on • Cryptocurrency mining continues to consume increasing amounts of computer power, despite a drop in prices, reports Matthew Sparkes

First image of our galaxy’s black hole • The Event Horizon Telescope collaboration has released the first ever picture of the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way, reports Leah Crane

What’s next for the Event Horizon Telescope?

Countries drag their feet on COP26 pledges • Six months on, we are still waiting to see improved climate plans that were promised at the summit in the UK, reports Adam Vaughan

NHS health data plan mothballed • A plan to use the mobile phone records of NHS patients to predict mental health crises has been scrapped, showing the difficulties of using such data, reports Matthew Sparkes

Last days of the home for clever birds • A Cambridge lab that has made seminal discoveries on animal intelligence is facing closure as funding dries up, reports Alison George

Maxwell’s demon could be made real without breaking the laws of physics

Flu vaccine cuts risk of heart attack in next year by a third

Virtual reality mask makes breathing harder for realism

Genetically modified bacteria learn to play tic-tac-toe

African ant diagnoses and treats wounds with antimicrobial medicine

Sweater uses wireless charging to top up your gadgets

Quantum-safe encryption delayed • Hitch for new security methods to keep data secure when quantum computing matures

Portable liquid sunlight could power your gadgets

The shape of a city influences how much rain it gets

Some medicines to treat back pain may prolong the problem

Invasive chameleons have evolved new colour displays

Modern flu may be down to 1918 virus

Algae battery used to power processor

Really brief

Long-frozen testicle cells can make sperm

Plants can grow in moon soil, but not very well

Why do octopuses self-destruct?

Stemming the gap • Girls are just as capable as boys in science and mathematics, but ingrained attitudes stop them from engaging, says Maria Rossini

No planet bee • A sting in the tail The recent boom in urban beekeeping is pitting domesticated bees against wild pollinator species and damaging conservation efforts, writes Graham Lawton

Cancer foes

Your letters

Evelyn’s big adventure • This poignant, playful sci-fi adventure features a woman coping with everyday chaos and a threatened multiverse, says Robyn Chowdhury

How poor sleep kills you – and others

Greener shoots • Farming is killing our planet, argues a terrifying new book. Luckily, it also offers radical solutions, finds Rowan Hooper

Don’t miss

Out of this world • A couple discover a portal to another planet in Night Sky, but the show’s most affecting moments have nothing to do with intergalactic travel, finds Josh Bell

Solar surprise • Solar storms can wreak havoc on Earth, but we usually see them coming. Now physicists fear the sun will strike with no warning at all, finds Stuart Clark

Deep-fried internet

‘There are a lot of things that make us human – our vaginal...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: May 21 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: May 19, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

The climate imperative • We can’t let crucial action on emissions be derailed by today’s short-term crises

New Scientist International Edition

Bitcoin powers on • Cryptocurrency mining continues to consume increasing amounts of computer power, despite a drop in prices, reports Matthew Sparkes

First image of our galaxy’s black hole • The Event Horizon Telescope collaboration has released the first ever picture of the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way, reports Leah Crane

What’s next for the Event Horizon Telescope?

Countries drag their feet on COP26 pledges • Six months on, we are still waiting to see improved climate plans that were promised at the summit in the UK, reports Adam Vaughan

NHS health data plan mothballed • A plan to use the mobile phone records of NHS patients to predict mental health crises has been scrapped, showing the difficulties of using such data, reports Matthew Sparkes

Last days of the home for clever birds • A Cambridge lab that has made seminal discoveries on animal intelligence is facing closure as funding dries up, reports Alison George

Maxwell’s demon could be made real without breaking the laws of physics

Flu vaccine cuts risk of heart attack in next year by a third

Virtual reality mask makes breathing harder for realism

Genetically modified bacteria learn to play tic-tac-toe

African ant diagnoses and treats wounds with antimicrobial medicine

Sweater uses wireless charging to top up your gadgets

Quantum-safe encryption delayed • Hitch for new security methods to keep data secure when quantum computing matures

Portable liquid sunlight could power your gadgets

The shape of a city influences how much rain it gets

Some medicines to treat back pain may prolong the problem

Invasive chameleons have evolved new colour displays

Modern flu may be down to 1918 virus

Algae battery used to power processor

Really brief

Long-frozen testicle cells can make sperm

Plants can grow in moon soil, but not very well

Why do octopuses self-destruct?

Stemming the gap • Girls are just as capable as boys in science and mathematics, but ingrained attitudes stop them from engaging, says Maria Rossini

No planet bee • A sting in the tail The recent boom in urban beekeeping is pitting domesticated bees against wild pollinator species and damaging conservation efforts, writes Graham Lawton

Cancer foes

Your letters

Evelyn’s big adventure • This poignant, playful sci-fi adventure features a woman coping with everyday chaos and a threatened multiverse, says Robyn Chowdhury

How poor sleep kills you – and others

Greener shoots • Farming is killing our planet, argues a terrifying new book. Luckily, it also offers radical solutions, finds Rowan Hooper

Don’t miss

Out of this world • A couple discover a portal to another planet in Night Sky, but the show’s most affecting moments have nothing to do with intergalactic travel, finds Josh Bell

Solar surprise • Solar storms can wreak havoc on Earth, but we usually see them coming. Now physicists fear the sun will strike with no warning at all, finds Stuart Clark

Deep-fried internet

‘There are a lot of things that make us human – our vaginal...


Expand title description text