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New Scientist International Edition

Jun 25 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Beyond chemo • Cancer vaccines could usher therapies into a new era

New Scientist International Edition

Extreme heat in Europe • A series of heatwaves has hit the continent unusually early this year and caused problems for many, reports Adam Vaughan

Future of UK farming up for grabs • A government decision on how to balance food production and climate commitments is expected next year, and there is no shortage of opinion on the issue, finds Adam Vaughan

Food miles matter less than you might think • Despite what a new study seems to suggest, eating locally isn’t the best way to lower your carbon footprint, says Michael Le Page

The universe is weirdly lopsided • Two analyses of a million galaxies show that their distribution may not be symmetrical, which may mean our understanding of the cosmos is incorrect, says Leah Crane

Long covid risk with omicron may be half that of delta

Melting ice could open up a new Arctic Sea route

How can we prevent AI from being racist, sexist and offensive? • Artificial intelligences continue to display the same biases and prejudices as humans, but there are ways we can improve the situation, says Matthew Sparkes

Solar storms may cause thousands of heart-related deaths on Earth

Quantum microphone beats a regular one

Enormous impact flash lights up Jupiter’s atmosphere

El Salvador’s crypto gamble goes sour • The Central American nation has blown vast sums on a grand plan to build its economy around bitcoin, reports Luke Taylor

Underwater volcanic world • A photographer has documented volcanic activity under the sea

Working in virtual reality cuts productivity

Pollution from rockets could affect weather systems

Younger children to try CRISPR therapy for sickle cell disease

Ancient meteorite overturns our ideas of how Mars formed

Global satellite map will help hunt down illegal fishing vessels

Tiny jumping frogs lack balance to stick the landing

Genes give clue to your covid-19 risk

Moon samples are drier than expected

Really brief

BP stock unscathed by spill in long term

Brain-like AI chip enables a robo game of cat and mouse

Natural drug reduces eating in obese mice

Polluted partnerships • Elite universities must urgently end their cosy relationships with the fossil fuel industry, says Zak Coleman

This changes everything • Return of the encabulator An 80-year-old meme that fondly satirises absurd technical language is still bringing engineers joy, finds Annalee Newitz, who is ready for the crypto version

Aliens of the sea

Your letters

Passing the smell test • When Paola Totaro lost her ability to smell, she set out to investigate the least studied of our senses in this timely book, finds Vijaysree Venkatraman

Plastic surgery’s first pioneer

Cool tunes • From work by an Indigenous orchestra to the songs of a sci-art pioneer, music is being preserved in ice, finds Chelsea Whyte

Don’t miss

The games column • Send in the backup From global chip shortages to the war in Ukraine, major games studios are being forced to delay their big releases. Luckily, eager players can find solace in smaller games like Silt or Spacelines from the Far Out, says Jacob Aron

Time to get personal...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Jun 25 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: June 23, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Beyond chemo • Cancer vaccines could usher therapies into a new era

New Scientist International Edition

Extreme heat in Europe • A series of heatwaves has hit the continent unusually early this year and caused problems for many, reports Adam Vaughan

Future of UK farming up for grabs • A government decision on how to balance food production and climate commitments is expected next year, and there is no shortage of opinion on the issue, finds Adam Vaughan

Food miles matter less than you might think • Despite what a new study seems to suggest, eating locally isn’t the best way to lower your carbon footprint, says Michael Le Page

The universe is weirdly lopsided • Two analyses of a million galaxies show that their distribution may not be symmetrical, which may mean our understanding of the cosmos is incorrect, says Leah Crane

Long covid risk with omicron may be half that of delta

Melting ice could open up a new Arctic Sea route

How can we prevent AI from being racist, sexist and offensive? • Artificial intelligences continue to display the same biases and prejudices as humans, but there are ways we can improve the situation, says Matthew Sparkes

Solar storms may cause thousands of heart-related deaths on Earth

Quantum microphone beats a regular one

Enormous impact flash lights up Jupiter’s atmosphere

El Salvador’s crypto gamble goes sour • The Central American nation has blown vast sums on a grand plan to build its economy around bitcoin, reports Luke Taylor

Underwater volcanic world • A photographer has documented volcanic activity under the sea

Working in virtual reality cuts productivity

Pollution from rockets could affect weather systems

Younger children to try CRISPR therapy for sickle cell disease

Ancient meteorite overturns our ideas of how Mars formed

Global satellite map will help hunt down illegal fishing vessels

Tiny jumping frogs lack balance to stick the landing

Genes give clue to your covid-19 risk

Moon samples are drier than expected

Really brief

BP stock unscathed by spill in long term

Brain-like AI chip enables a robo game of cat and mouse

Natural drug reduces eating in obese mice

Polluted partnerships • Elite universities must urgently end their cosy relationships with the fossil fuel industry, says Zak Coleman

This changes everything • Return of the encabulator An 80-year-old meme that fondly satirises absurd technical language is still bringing engineers joy, finds Annalee Newitz, who is ready for the crypto version

Aliens of the sea

Your letters

Passing the smell test • When Paola Totaro lost her ability to smell, she set out to investigate the least studied of our senses in this timely book, finds Vijaysree Venkatraman

Plastic surgery’s first pioneer

Cool tunes • From work by an Indigenous orchestra to the songs of a sci-art pioneer, music is being preserved in ice, finds Chelsea Whyte

Don’t miss

The games column • Send in the backup From global chip shortages to the war in Ukraine, major games studios are being forced to delay their big releases. Luckily, eager players can find solace in smaller games like Silt or Spacelines from the Far Out, says Jacob Aron

Time to get personal...


Expand title description text