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New Scientist International Edition

Jul 09 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

A new dawn for astronomy • Seeing the first images from our new space telescope will be a moment to cherish

New Scientist International Edition

Fusion plans announced • A European consortium is beginning to design a commercial nuclear fusion power plant to be built by 2054, reports Adam Vaughan

US ruling may harm climate efforts • A decision by the US Supreme Court clarifies a long-running row about the role of the Environmental Protection Agency, says James Dinneen

Firms plan to clean up construction with net-zero concrete

Self-cooling quantum computer made of diamonds

Time loops may be easier to achieve than we thought

‘Fair’ AI looks at racial bias • Black homebuyers in the US could get a boost from AI decision-making

Intermittent fasting linked to improved gut function in mice

Molecular computer is extremely energy efficient

Brain electrodes may be long-lasting aid for depression

Largest of the water lilies • Victoria boliviana is the third known giant water lily – and the biggest

Floating buoy uses waves to power itself

We may know why some IVF embryos stop developing

Alien earthworms have invaded nearly all of North America

UK set to miss carbon goals due to failure to insulate homes

Dinosaurs’ ability to survive cold helped them rule the planet

AI predicts crime a week in advance • The location of crimes could be accurately predicted, but bias concerns persist

Implantable device blocks pain by chilling nerves

Alternative CRISPR tool may be better way to edit genes

The ‘human climate niche’ may shrink drastically this century

The risks from covid-19 reinfection • A study has found that people who catch the coronavirus two or three times go on to have higher rates of everything from heart disease to kidney disorders, reports Michael Le Page

Dogs related to two groups of wolves

Structures take shape in mid-air

Faecal swap offers hope of lasting relief from IBS pain

Really brief

A grassroots movement • Seagrass meadows are vanishing at a rate of 7 per cent a year. Restoring them would be a huge conservation win, says Sophie Pavelle

Field notes from space-time • Space for intuition When it comes to the complexities of space-time, intuition comes in different ways, depending on the level of science you have access to, says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Out of this world

Your letters

Into Chernobyl’s exclusion zone • An extraordinary window onto the area around the devastated nuclear power plant reveals a “land of tranquillity and frozen time”, finds George Bass

Worlds apart • Animals have amazing inner lives we barely grasp. A powerful new book explains why this matters, says Anna Demming

Don’t miss

The film column • When lightning strikes A gentle fantasy about a lonely inventor called Brian, whose world changes completely when a robot he creates comes to life, makes a serious point about the possibilities of personal robots, finds Simon Ings

THE COSMOS AS WE’VE NEVER SEEN IT BEFORE • The James Webb Space Telescope has the power to unravel some of the biggest mysteries of the universe. Here are some of the cosmic wonders it will look at first, says astronomer María Arias

Expect the unexpected

“I call...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Jul 09 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: July 7, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

A new dawn for astronomy • Seeing the first images from our new space telescope will be a moment to cherish

New Scientist International Edition

Fusion plans announced • A European consortium is beginning to design a commercial nuclear fusion power plant to be built by 2054, reports Adam Vaughan

US ruling may harm climate efforts • A decision by the US Supreme Court clarifies a long-running row about the role of the Environmental Protection Agency, says James Dinneen

Firms plan to clean up construction with net-zero concrete

Self-cooling quantum computer made of diamonds

Time loops may be easier to achieve than we thought

‘Fair’ AI looks at racial bias • Black homebuyers in the US could get a boost from AI decision-making

Intermittent fasting linked to improved gut function in mice

Molecular computer is extremely energy efficient

Brain electrodes may be long-lasting aid for depression

Largest of the water lilies • Victoria boliviana is the third known giant water lily – and the biggest

Floating buoy uses waves to power itself

We may know why some IVF embryos stop developing

Alien earthworms have invaded nearly all of North America

UK set to miss carbon goals due to failure to insulate homes

Dinosaurs’ ability to survive cold helped them rule the planet

AI predicts crime a week in advance • The location of crimes could be accurately predicted, but bias concerns persist

Implantable device blocks pain by chilling nerves

Alternative CRISPR tool may be better way to edit genes

The ‘human climate niche’ may shrink drastically this century

The risks from covid-19 reinfection • A study has found that people who catch the coronavirus two or three times go on to have higher rates of everything from heart disease to kidney disorders, reports Michael Le Page

Dogs related to two groups of wolves

Structures take shape in mid-air

Faecal swap offers hope of lasting relief from IBS pain

Really brief

A grassroots movement • Seagrass meadows are vanishing at a rate of 7 per cent a year. Restoring them would be a huge conservation win, says Sophie Pavelle

Field notes from space-time • Space for intuition When it comes to the complexities of space-time, intuition comes in different ways, depending on the level of science you have access to, says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Out of this world

Your letters

Into Chernobyl’s exclusion zone • An extraordinary window onto the area around the devastated nuclear power plant reveals a “land of tranquillity and frozen time”, finds George Bass

Worlds apart • Animals have amazing inner lives we barely grasp. A powerful new book explains why this matters, says Anna Demming

Don’t miss

The film column • When lightning strikes A gentle fantasy about a lonely inventor called Brian, whose world changes completely when a robot he creates comes to life, makes a serious point about the possibilities of personal robots, finds Simon Ings

THE COSMOS AS WE’VE NEVER SEEN IT BEFORE • The James Webb Space Telescope has the power to unravel some of the biggest mysteries of the universe. Here are some of the cosmic wonders it will look at first, says astronomer María Arias

Expect the unexpected

“I call...


Expand title description text