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New Scientist International Edition

Jul 16 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Forgotten, but not gone • We can curb covid-19 infection rates if we want to – but we can’t do it without data

New Scientist International Edition

Omicron still on the rise • The BA.4 and BA.5 subvariants of omicron are driving an increase in covid-19 cases in many countries, reports Clare Wilson

Seeing further than ever before • This stunning full-colour image from the James Webb Space Telescope is just a taste of what is to come, says Leah Crane

How JWST’s striking first colour image was made

UK scientists face uncertain future • Politicians have promised to replace a funding stream from the European Union, but Boris Johnson’s departure has cast doubt on these plans, reports Jonathan O’Callaghan

Male infertility linked to mutations on X chromosome

Attempts to regulate autonomous weapons are failing • An upcoming United Nations meeting will most likely struggle to reach a consensus on controlling the use of “killer robots”, says David Hambling

Nonsense videos teach AI physics • Algorithms that understand how objects obey physical laws could be more efficient

Hurricane in Jamaica helped change mountain ecology

Men may eat more in summer as the sun makes them hungry

The chance falling rockets will hit someone is increasing

Computer components based on vibrations could save energy

AI creates 3D scenes in the style of famous artworks

Fin whales bounce back • Groups of up to 150 whales have been seen in the Antarctic

Three-eyed predator stalked ancient seas

Pesticides and pollutants found in bats’ livers

AI can use your brainwaves to ‘see’ things that you cannot

Optimising crop genetics could double wheat yields

Gel-coated battery could stop phones catching fire

ADHD drugs may help Alzheimer’s

Big dinosaur had tiny arms like T. rex

Protective goggles save shrimp from shock waves

Really brief

Black market birds • Jurassic World Dominion’s dinosaur trafficking isn’t far from a feathered reality. The illegal trade in birds must stop, says Raj Tawney

No planet B • No climate for coal The UK’s new levelling up secretary must not let a new coal mine in Cumbria go ahead. It would be indefensible on climate grounds, says Adam Vaughan

A grisly history

Your letters

To bee or not to bee • Does a bee have a mind of its own, awareness of the world, basic emotions and intelligence? Alun Anderson explores a brave new book that makes the case

Lost in meta-space • Grappling with the elusive metaverse makes for a mixed read, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

Don’t miss

Music from the black hole • Will an extraordinary work called Black Hole Symphony be a triumph for science? Bethan Ackerley takes a peek at this upcoming concert series

INTO THE BLUE • A day out in nature is wonderfully good for us. But for the best benefits, don’t opt for green space, head for the water, says Catherine de Lange

Six tips for making the most of nature

Doing it for the kids

Bees vs wasps • Bees get all the good PR compared with wasps, but how do their talents really measure up? Chris Simms stages the ultimate insect showdown

A knotty problem • Mathematicians are unpicking the question of how many knots exist. As they do, they are...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Jul 16 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: July 14, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Forgotten, but not gone • We can curb covid-19 infection rates if we want to – but we can’t do it without data

New Scientist International Edition

Omicron still on the rise • The BA.4 and BA.5 subvariants of omicron are driving an increase in covid-19 cases in many countries, reports Clare Wilson

Seeing further than ever before • This stunning full-colour image from the James Webb Space Telescope is just a taste of what is to come, says Leah Crane

How JWST’s striking first colour image was made

UK scientists face uncertain future • Politicians have promised to replace a funding stream from the European Union, but Boris Johnson’s departure has cast doubt on these plans, reports Jonathan O’Callaghan

Male infertility linked to mutations on X chromosome

Attempts to regulate autonomous weapons are failing • An upcoming United Nations meeting will most likely struggle to reach a consensus on controlling the use of “killer robots”, says David Hambling

Nonsense videos teach AI physics • Algorithms that understand how objects obey physical laws could be more efficient

Hurricane in Jamaica helped change mountain ecology

Men may eat more in summer as the sun makes them hungry

The chance falling rockets will hit someone is increasing

Computer components based on vibrations could save energy

AI creates 3D scenes in the style of famous artworks

Fin whales bounce back • Groups of up to 150 whales have been seen in the Antarctic

Three-eyed predator stalked ancient seas

Pesticides and pollutants found in bats’ livers

AI can use your brainwaves to ‘see’ things that you cannot

Optimising crop genetics could double wheat yields

Gel-coated battery could stop phones catching fire

ADHD drugs may help Alzheimer’s

Big dinosaur had tiny arms like T. rex

Protective goggles save shrimp from shock waves

Really brief

Black market birds • Jurassic World Dominion’s dinosaur trafficking isn’t far from a feathered reality. The illegal trade in birds must stop, says Raj Tawney

No planet B • No climate for coal The UK’s new levelling up secretary must not let a new coal mine in Cumbria go ahead. It would be indefensible on climate grounds, says Adam Vaughan

A grisly history

Your letters

To bee or not to bee • Does a bee have a mind of its own, awareness of the world, basic emotions and intelligence? Alun Anderson explores a brave new book that makes the case

Lost in meta-space • Grappling with the elusive metaverse makes for a mixed read, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

Don’t miss

Music from the black hole • Will an extraordinary work called Black Hole Symphony be a triumph for science? Bethan Ackerley takes a peek at this upcoming concert series

INTO THE BLUE • A day out in nature is wonderfully good for us. But for the best benefits, don’t opt for green space, head for the water, says Catherine de Lange

Six tips for making the most of nature

Doing it for the kids

Bees vs wasps • Bees get all the good PR compared with wasps, but how do their talents really measure up? Chris Simms stages the ultimate insect showdown

A knotty problem • Mathematicians are unpicking the question of how many knots exist. As they do, they are...


Expand title description text