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New Scientist International Edition

Jul 23 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Climate change hits hard • Will the European heatwave finally spark politicians into action?

New Scientist International Edition

UK hits 40°C for first time • UK temperature record broken as extreme heatwave causes fires, evacuations and deaths across Europe, reports Adam Vaughan

A delightful deluge of stars • The first set of science images from the James Webb Space Telescope is an incredible feast for the eyes, mind and heart

Great heavens

A glimpse of chemistry in a distant galaxy

Collision risk may limit Webb’s view

Cosmic questions answered • New Scientist space reporter Leah Crane explains what the first images from the James Webb Space Telescope can tell us and what it will look for in the future

Unscrambling the cosmos • Astronomers are already using the images from the James Webb Space Telescope to reveal a new understanding of the objects they depict, says Leah Crane

Field notes Rewilding in Kent • Wild bison roam in the UK for the first time Four bison were released into an English woodland that they are expected to transform, reports Adam Vaughan

Skull helps piece together puzzle of ancient human migration into America

New kind of laser could produce ultra-sharp displays

Impact of covid-19 on sperm • As the pandemic has continued, evidence has built up about the way the coronavirus affects sperm cells and fertility, reports Carissa Wong

Robot claimed to be self-aware • A machine knows its own position in space, but is this really a form of self-perception?

Moving turtle eggs to protect them harms development

Woodpeckers’ skulls don’t act as shock absorbers

Y chromosome loss may cause heart disease in some men

Modified pig hearts transplanted into brain-dead people kept on life support

Robot made of sticky tape and powder could help fix organs

Glove lets you grab like an octopus

Antarctic bacteria reveal heat limit

Penguins adapt accents to sound like their friends

Really brief

Part of the family? • Firms increasingly aim to foster loyalty via corporate rituals that tap into ancient desires. We should beware, says Jonathan R. Goodman

This changes everything • The curious case of the AI and the lawyer Claiming that an AI is sentient and needs legal counsel to represent its rights is to let those truly responsible for it off the hook, writes Annalee Newitz

Mini supernovae

Your letters

What we will be reading on holiday

Time to savour some science • Whether it is the science of sleep, the physics that changed the world or the inner lives of bees, we’ve got you covered for holiday reading, says Liz Else

A universe of possibilities • From climate catastrophe in Suffolk to a cyberpunk version of Delhi, Adam Roberts picks the best sci-fi to read on holiday

The games column • Armchair voyages If you can’t travel beyond your living room for a holiday, then video games have you covered, whether you fancy flying a plane, driving a truck or exploring an entire galaxy of fictional planets, says Jacob Aron

How to grow a brain • Lab-made “mini-brains” are transforming our understanding of the most mysterious organ. Just how lifelike are they going to get, asks Clare Wilson

Going viral • Plagues often spark cultural...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Jul 23 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: July 21, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Climate change hits hard • Will the European heatwave finally spark politicians into action?

New Scientist International Edition

UK hits 40°C for first time • UK temperature record broken as extreme heatwave causes fires, evacuations and deaths across Europe, reports Adam Vaughan

A delightful deluge of stars • The first set of science images from the James Webb Space Telescope is an incredible feast for the eyes, mind and heart

Great heavens

A glimpse of chemistry in a distant galaxy

Collision risk may limit Webb’s view

Cosmic questions answered • New Scientist space reporter Leah Crane explains what the first images from the James Webb Space Telescope can tell us and what it will look for in the future

Unscrambling the cosmos • Astronomers are already using the images from the James Webb Space Telescope to reveal a new understanding of the objects they depict, says Leah Crane

Field notes Rewilding in Kent • Wild bison roam in the UK for the first time Four bison were released into an English woodland that they are expected to transform, reports Adam Vaughan

Skull helps piece together puzzle of ancient human migration into America

New kind of laser could produce ultra-sharp displays

Impact of covid-19 on sperm • As the pandemic has continued, evidence has built up about the way the coronavirus affects sperm cells and fertility, reports Carissa Wong

Robot claimed to be self-aware • A machine knows its own position in space, but is this really a form of self-perception?

Moving turtle eggs to protect them harms development

Woodpeckers’ skulls don’t act as shock absorbers

Y chromosome loss may cause heart disease in some men

Modified pig hearts transplanted into brain-dead people kept on life support

Robot made of sticky tape and powder could help fix organs

Glove lets you grab like an octopus

Antarctic bacteria reveal heat limit

Penguins adapt accents to sound like their friends

Really brief

Part of the family? • Firms increasingly aim to foster loyalty via corporate rituals that tap into ancient desires. We should beware, says Jonathan R. Goodman

This changes everything • The curious case of the AI and the lawyer Claiming that an AI is sentient and needs legal counsel to represent its rights is to let those truly responsible for it off the hook, writes Annalee Newitz

Mini supernovae

Your letters

What we will be reading on holiday

Time to savour some science • Whether it is the science of sleep, the physics that changed the world or the inner lives of bees, we’ve got you covered for holiday reading, says Liz Else

A universe of possibilities • From climate catastrophe in Suffolk to a cyberpunk version of Delhi, Adam Roberts picks the best sci-fi to read on holiday

The games column • Armchair voyages If you can’t travel beyond your living room for a holiday, then video games have you covered, whether you fancy flying a plane, driving a truck or exploring an entire galaxy of fictional planets, says Jacob Aron

How to grow a brain • Lab-made “mini-brains” are transforming our understanding of the most mysterious organ. Just how lifelike are they going to get, asks Clare Wilson

Going viral • Plagues often spark cultural...


Expand title description text