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New Scientist International Edition

Aug 06 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

A note from the editor

Biology’s cup runneth over • AI can now reliably predict crucial information on vast numbers of proteins

New Scientist International Edition

Monkeypox claims lives • The monkeypox outbreak’s death toll is rising, but knowledge of symptoms is improving, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

Huge protein breakthrough • AlphaFold, an AI created by UK firm DeepMind, has predicted the structure of nearly all known proteins – a monumental feat, reports Matthew Sparkes

Analysis Biochemistry • Why AlphaFold is transformational Understanding the complex structures of proteins is key to developing drugs and knowing how living things work, says Michael Le Page

The race for the furthest galaxy • The James Webb Space Telescope keeps breaking its own record for the most distant galaxy ever found, reports Leah Crane

New telescope could tell us what exoplanet surfaces are made of

JWST spots a weird galaxy with almost no heavy elements

How pobblebonk frogs handle acidic pools

Forensic fingerprinting technique could help spot document fraud

Symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome may be caused by mini blood clots

Voice jammer stops anyone from recording you speak

Could vaccines end the pandemic? • Nasal vaccines may stem transmission, while universal ones could target proteins in every SARS-CoV-2 variant and even other coronaviruses, reports Michael Le Page

Fraudsters in the US could use loophole to get material for a ‘dirty bomb’

Moths are doing more pollinating than we thought

Field notes Rushton Woods Preserve, Pennsylvania • Tiny trackers reveal bird migration routes in amazing detail “Nanotags” being fitted on birds at a nature preserve outside Philadelphia are revolutionising tracking, finds Corryn Wetzel

Dental X-rays likely to be used to assess the ages of asylum seekers in the UK

Computer cables become antenna to steal data

Covid-19 taste issue affects more women

Robot hand contains artificial muscles

Highest safe dives for most people calculated

Really brief

Advertising crisis • We urgently need a public information campaign about the climate emergency, to both educate and trigger action, says Bill McGuire

Field notes from space-time • Emerging from the background General relativity is known as a background independent theory. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein sets out to explain what this means

Fathoms deep

Your letters

Rewilding the world • The challenge of returning lost species to ecosystems in countries affected by conflict adds complexity to this rewilding story, says Jack Ashby

It’s only a movie… • Why do we love scary films? How do their makers get under our skin? Elle Hunt explores a book that dares to ask

Don’t miss

The film column • The hardest journey An intriguing documentary about the life and adventures of Ranulph Fiennes, one of the last hero-explorers of our time, packs an altogether different punch at the end, discovers Simon Ings

Cracking the code • Much of the world’s first writing, carved into clay tablets, is undeciphered. Now, AI is helping us piece together this strange script, revealing incredible stories of civilisations at the dawn of history, finds Alison George

Reading the signs

Blasts from the...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Aug 06 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: August 4, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

A note from the editor

Biology’s cup runneth over • AI can now reliably predict crucial information on vast numbers of proteins

New Scientist International Edition

Monkeypox claims lives • The monkeypox outbreak’s death toll is rising, but knowledge of symptoms is improving, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

Huge protein breakthrough • AlphaFold, an AI created by UK firm DeepMind, has predicted the structure of nearly all known proteins – a monumental feat, reports Matthew Sparkes

Analysis Biochemistry • Why AlphaFold is transformational Understanding the complex structures of proteins is key to developing drugs and knowing how living things work, says Michael Le Page

The race for the furthest galaxy • The James Webb Space Telescope keeps breaking its own record for the most distant galaxy ever found, reports Leah Crane

New telescope could tell us what exoplanet surfaces are made of

JWST spots a weird galaxy with almost no heavy elements

How pobblebonk frogs handle acidic pools

Forensic fingerprinting technique could help spot document fraud

Symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome may be caused by mini blood clots

Voice jammer stops anyone from recording you speak

Could vaccines end the pandemic? • Nasal vaccines may stem transmission, while universal ones could target proteins in every SARS-CoV-2 variant and even other coronaviruses, reports Michael Le Page

Fraudsters in the US could use loophole to get material for a ‘dirty bomb’

Moths are doing more pollinating than we thought

Field notes Rushton Woods Preserve, Pennsylvania • Tiny trackers reveal bird migration routes in amazing detail “Nanotags” being fitted on birds at a nature preserve outside Philadelphia are revolutionising tracking, finds Corryn Wetzel

Dental X-rays likely to be used to assess the ages of asylum seekers in the UK

Computer cables become antenna to steal data

Covid-19 taste issue affects more women

Robot hand contains artificial muscles

Highest safe dives for most people calculated

Really brief

Advertising crisis • We urgently need a public information campaign about the climate emergency, to both educate and trigger action, says Bill McGuire

Field notes from space-time • Emerging from the background General relativity is known as a background independent theory. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein sets out to explain what this means

Fathoms deep

Your letters

Rewilding the world • The challenge of returning lost species to ecosystems in countries affected by conflict adds complexity to this rewilding story, says Jack Ashby

It’s only a movie… • Why do we love scary films? How do their makers get under our skin? Elle Hunt explores a book that dares to ask

Don’t miss

The film column • The hardest journey An intriguing documentary about the life and adventures of Ranulph Fiennes, one of the last hero-explorers of our time, packs an altogether different punch at the end, discovers Simon Ings

Cracking the code • Much of the world’s first writing, carved into clay tablets, is undeciphered. Now, AI is helping us piece together this strange script, revealing incredible stories of civilisations at the dawn of history, finds Alison George

Reading the signs

Blasts from the...


Expand title description text