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New Scientist

Aug 27 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Going wild • Plant consciousness might be an uncomfortable concept, but it is worth exploring

New Scientist

China’s worst heatwave • A long spell of extreme hot and dry weather is affecting energy, water supplies and food production, reports Michael Le Page

A way to predict earthquakes before they happen

First demonstration of tricky final Rubik’s cube sequence

Peering into a strange galaxy • The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy has spectacular regions of star formation

Distinct brain areas light up for close friends

Shine comes off the promise of quantum chemistry

It may snow upwards in the oceans of icy moons

Covid-19 linked to brain conditions • The risk of being diagnosed with some neurological conditions after having covid-19 may be higher than for other respiratory infections, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

Most people with covid-19 are still infectious after five days…

… while many with omicron don’t know they are infected

Abortion fight flares up in the UK • Doctors in the UK say that attempts to restrict access to abortion services are an unacceptable barrier to healthcare, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

Mars rover to get speed boost from software update

Genetic tinkering increases soy yield by upgrading photosynthesis

The star Betelgeuse just keeps on acting weird

Creature with mouth but no anus isn’t human ancestor

Your phone could tell it’s you just by the way you hold it

Proton’s charming nature revealed • Despite it being found in every atom, we are still learning more about the proton

Living robots may be able to help repair neurons

Tiny DNA-testing chip could combine many medical tests

A second asteroid may have struck at end of dinosaur era

Megalodon could easily eat a whale

Plastic upcycled into more valuable items

Chewing uses a surprising amount of energy

Really brief

Space for everyone • Some scientists are unhappy about the James Webb Space Telescope’s data being made public immediately, but these images should be for all, says Jacob Aron

My botanical life • Walls of life Green roofs have existed for more than 2000 years, but, along with living walls, they are becoming more popular – and provide major eco-benefits, writes Beronda L. Montgomery

Picture this

Editor’s pick

The making of Gaia • Letters between the two scientists who co-developed the paradigm-changing Gaia hypothesis make for fascinating reading, says Adam Vaughan

UFO sci-fi horror is a must-see

Genetics, for good or bad • This thought-provoking new history asks whether genetic engineering is worth the effort, finds Michael Marshall

Don’t miss

The sci-fi column • Outsider insights Can crushing despair make great reading? Face and The Sleepless are two noir-inflected novels that compel with their bleak visions and great writing, both coming from distinct perspectives, says Sally Adee

The inner mind of plants • Are plants conscious? It is a controversial idea, but a small team of researchers are determined to find out, says Natalie Lawrence

Shrinking violets

Growbots

Want a glimpse of baby’s future? • If you were offered the chance to unravel your child’s whole genome just after birth to see what may...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Aug 27 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: August 25, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Going wild • Plant consciousness might be an uncomfortable concept, but it is worth exploring

New Scientist

China’s worst heatwave • A long spell of extreme hot and dry weather is affecting energy, water supplies and food production, reports Michael Le Page

A way to predict earthquakes before they happen

First demonstration of tricky final Rubik’s cube sequence

Peering into a strange galaxy • The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy has spectacular regions of star formation

Distinct brain areas light up for close friends

Shine comes off the promise of quantum chemistry

It may snow upwards in the oceans of icy moons

Covid-19 linked to brain conditions • The risk of being diagnosed with some neurological conditions after having covid-19 may be higher than for other respiratory infections, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

Most people with covid-19 are still infectious after five days…

… while many with omicron don’t know they are infected

Abortion fight flares up in the UK • Doctors in the UK say that attempts to restrict access to abortion services are an unacceptable barrier to healthcare, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

Mars rover to get speed boost from software update

Genetic tinkering increases soy yield by upgrading photosynthesis

The star Betelgeuse just keeps on acting weird

Creature with mouth but no anus isn’t human ancestor

Your phone could tell it’s you just by the way you hold it

Proton’s charming nature revealed • Despite it being found in every atom, we are still learning more about the proton

Living robots may be able to help repair neurons

Tiny DNA-testing chip could combine many medical tests

A second asteroid may have struck at end of dinosaur era

Megalodon could easily eat a whale

Plastic upcycled into more valuable items

Chewing uses a surprising amount of energy

Really brief

Space for everyone • Some scientists are unhappy about the James Webb Space Telescope’s data being made public immediately, but these images should be for all, says Jacob Aron

My botanical life • Walls of life Green roofs have existed for more than 2000 years, but, along with living walls, they are becoming more popular – and provide major eco-benefits, writes Beronda L. Montgomery

Picture this

Editor’s pick

The making of Gaia • Letters between the two scientists who co-developed the paradigm-changing Gaia hypothesis make for fascinating reading, says Adam Vaughan

UFO sci-fi horror is a must-see

Genetics, for good or bad • This thought-provoking new history asks whether genetic engineering is worth the effort, finds Michael Marshall

Don’t miss

The sci-fi column • Outsider insights Can crushing despair make great reading? Face and The Sleepless are two noir-inflected novels that compel with their bleak visions and great writing, both coming from distinct perspectives, says Sally Adee

The inner mind of plants • Are plants conscious? It is a controversial idea, but a small team of researchers are determined to find out, says Natalie Lawrence

Shrinking violets

Growbots

Want a glimpse of baby’s future? • If you were offered the chance to unravel your child’s whole genome just after birth to see what may...


Expand title description text