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New Scientist International Edition

Sep 17 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Shoot for the moon • We should return to the moon not to escape Earth, but to learn to live better back home

New Scientist International Edition

New York battles polio • A state of emergency has been declared to boost vaccination efforts after poliovirus was found in sewage samples, reports Grace Wade

Self-replicating ribosomes are a step towards artificial life

One mutation may make us smarter than Neanderthals

Massive satellite could outshine all the stars and planets in the night sky

Quantum diamond used to measure neural activity

Google AI can tell what something smells like from its molecular structure

Juno prepares for close encounter with icy moon Europa

Studies of mice and men go awry • Mice are more stressed when handled by male experimenters than female ones, and the sex of researchers can influence the results of mouse experiments, reports Jonathan Moens

Climate tipping points loom closer • Runaway processes such as collapsing ice sheets and thawing permafrost are likely to be triggered if we breach even the 1.5°C temperature goal, reports Adam Vaughan

California set for big increase in extreme wildfires

Europe’s drought will lead to a huge wave of tree deaths

Analysis Climate change • Why have we seen so many heatwaves in 2022? As well as China having the worst heatwave in history, many other places have smashed records. Michael Le Page investigates

Two potentially habitable super-Earth planets spotted orbiting red dwarf star

Trick makes objects seem heavy or light in virtual reality

Pine marten in the city • The elusive mammal was recorded by a camera trap in London

Probiotic could treat rheumatoid arthritis

Laser on moon could propel light-sail craft across solar system

Child’s foot successfully amputated 31,000 years ago

Field notes IBM, New York • The world’s largest quantum computer fridge IBM has built a device that can become 100,000 times colder than outer space. Karmela Padavic-Callaghan takes a look inside

Crow-beak tweezers easily pick up beads

Weird planets may be stolen from stars

The best way to stop a bin-raiding cockatoo

Really brief

Come on in, the water’s cold • Outdoor swimming helps reduce inflammation, the cause of many health issues. It should be a public health measure, says Mark Harper

This changes everything • Stop calling it social media It was meant to let us chat freely in a digital public square, but the firms running social media are just as corporate as old media, says Annalee Newitz

Art of the ocean

Editor’s pick

The rise and rise of YouTube • Over 17 years, YouTube has transformed from a place to share home videos to a cultural juggernaut. A must-read book follows its journey, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

Down the toilet • Every day, we flush away a key natural resource – human faeces. Chelsea Whyte explores a book challenging us to think again

Don’t miss

Possible futures • In globally uncertain times, we need to think clearly about the future. Elle Hunt looks for help in a book with an ambitious, multi-lens approach

RETURN TO THE MOON

A DIFFERENT KIND OF SPACE RACE • This next phase of lunar exploration is a departure from what has come before in terms of ambition, the...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Sep 17 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: September 15, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Shoot for the moon • We should return to the moon not to escape Earth, but to learn to live better back home

New Scientist International Edition

New York battles polio • A state of emergency has been declared to boost vaccination efforts after poliovirus was found in sewage samples, reports Grace Wade

Self-replicating ribosomes are a step towards artificial life

One mutation may make us smarter than Neanderthals

Massive satellite could outshine all the stars and planets in the night sky

Quantum diamond used to measure neural activity

Google AI can tell what something smells like from its molecular structure

Juno prepares for close encounter with icy moon Europa

Studies of mice and men go awry • Mice are more stressed when handled by male experimenters than female ones, and the sex of researchers can influence the results of mouse experiments, reports Jonathan Moens

Climate tipping points loom closer • Runaway processes such as collapsing ice sheets and thawing permafrost are likely to be triggered if we breach even the 1.5°C temperature goal, reports Adam Vaughan

California set for big increase in extreme wildfires

Europe’s drought will lead to a huge wave of tree deaths

Analysis Climate change • Why have we seen so many heatwaves in 2022? As well as China having the worst heatwave in history, many other places have smashed records. Michael Le Page investigates

Two potentially habitable super-Earth planets spotted orbiting red dwarf star

Trick makes objects seem heavy or light in virtual reality

Pine marten in the city • The elusive mammal was recorded by a camera trap in London

Probiotic could treat rheumatoid arthritis

Laser on moon could propel light-sail craft across solar system

Child’s foot successfully amputated 31,000 years ago

Field notes IBM, New York • The world’s largest quantum computer fridge IBM has built a device that can become 100,000 times colder than outer space. Karmela Padavic-Callaghan takes a look inside

Crow-beak tweezers easily pick up beads

Weird planets may be stolen from stars

The best way to stop a bin-raiding cockatoo

Really brief

Come on in, the water’s cold • Outdoor swimming helps reduce inflammation, the cause of many health issues. It should be a public health measure, says Mark Harper

This changes everything • Stop calling it social media It was meant to let us chat freely in a digital public square, but the firms running social media are just as corporate as old media, says Annalee Newitz

Art of the ocean

Editor’s pick

The rise and rise of YouTube • Over 17 years, YouTube has transformed from a place to share home videos to a cultural juggernaut. A must-read book follows its journey, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

Down the toilet • Every day, we flush away a key natural resource – human faeces. Chelsea Whyte explores a book challenging us to think again

Don’t miss

Possible futures • In globally uncertain times, we need to think clearly about the future. Elle Hunt looks for help in a book with an ambitious, multi-lens approach

RETURN TO THE MOON

A DIFFERENT KIND OF SPACE RACE • This next phase of lunar exploration is a departure from what has come before in terms of ambition, the...


Expand title description text